Sunday, January 13, 2008

The Republic of Lakotah: An open letter of support to Russell Means

Since the writing of this letter, a new webpage has appeared on te net. The Republic ol Lakotah webpage is designed to discuss the need for, and assist in moving ahead with, what may well be called a two state solution.

My question is this: If secession is successfull, what will they do with the refugees who want to cross the border? I know what they will do with the Lakotah. What will they do with the disaffected non-natives? When citizens, black and white, come to the border? I Want to know. My wife may already be packing our things.

You can write Russell Means at treaty@plateautel.net

*****

Mr. Means,

I have been apprised of your movement for secession by an entry posted on a blog written by my publisher, Craig R. Smith of Smithcraft Press.

As an citizen of this country, as an American, I support this completely and applaud the effort regardless of the outcome. Further, I wish to know what I can do to make sure the outcome is as we both see it should be.

People expect assimilation. Cohabitation is not the same as assimilation. Far too much assimilation has taken place and far too much identity lost. Lost identity. Lost language. Lost land. Lost seeds. Lost rituals. Lost culture. Lost selves.

May your people regain all you can, all you lost, and stand as respected equals — the best you can be of who you are, not striving toward amorphism or an ambiguously defined version of what many Americans believe you should be.

I am new to this country. A second generation American, I am appreciative of the chances I have received, though can still remember being told by others I did not belong, being told I was not allowed here or there, being told by my family to fit in, assimilate, act like everyone else. What am I left with? A shallow sense of who I might have been. My children left to ask what we were and who they are.

My family, half of it, was in Germany. The other half in Russia. My family tree looks as though a chainsaw was taken to it and two thirds lopped off in jagged anger. Land taken. Lives taken. Identities taken.

And so, I can, in some ways, feel for what your people go through. But, I cannot imagine living with those who have done this to me. As you do. I cannot imagine seeing the land taken from me, knowing it is no longer mine. As you do. My reminders are in the past. Your’s are ever present.

And so, I wish to help how I can if such help is useful and desired. My time, effort and writing are here for the task.

My many thanks for your work.

Adam

(Adam Byrn Tritt, M.Ed, CHt)

3 comments:

Boy in the Bands (Scott Wells) said...

I think you're on the wrong side here. In this act, Means represents his own interests and his cohort declared independence without the will or support of any Lakota tribe.

Adam Byrn "Adamus" Tritt said...

Excellent. Please let me know where to find more information on this. If you as suggesting I am uninformed, and it does happen to the best of is, or that I have missed something, please point me toward the right wources.

You can post them here and, if it is of such import that I see I am clearly wrong, I will happily publish a follow-up post to that effect.

Lena said...

In response to the press release issued by Russell Means in December, the organization of Lakota traditional elders who are mandated to spearhead the treaty negotiations with the US government under the name of the Teton Sioux Nation Treaty Council, have declared the following:

The Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868 included an important provision. Article 12 was expressly crafted by our elders to protect the land, the people, and the Lakota way of life. It states that three-fourths of the Lakota male vote is necessary to change the treaty agreement.

Mr. Russell Means is only one man, and he does not have the required three-fourths Lakota adult male approval. His efforts, however, remind the whole world that the Lakota Nation still has an international treaty with the US government.

Signed: Charmaine white Face, spokesperson, Teton Sioux Nation Treaty Council (founded 1893)